ACCA f4

Topics: Judge, Appeal, Law Pages: 84 (2690 words) Published: July 4, 2014
Types
 of
 Law
Just
for Your Information :)

Public
 Law
 and
 Private
 Law
Criminal
 Law
 and
 Civil
 Law
Criminal
 Law
-­‐ A
 form
 of
 public
 law.
-­‐ Case
 must
 be
 proved
 by
 the
 prosecution
 beyond
 
reasonable
 doubt.
-­‐ Person
 guilty
 must
 be
 punished
 by
 fines,
 or
 
imprisonment.
-­‐ Object
 -­‐
 to
 regulate
 society
 by
 the
 threat
 of
 
punishment.
-­‐ The
 state
 is
 the
 prosecutor
 and
 prosecution
 is
 
brought
 in
 the
 name
 of
 the
 Public
 Prosecutor
 
e.g.
 PP
 v
 Jones.
Civil
 Law
-­‐ A
 form
 of
 private
 law.
-­‐ Case
 must
 be
 proved
 on
 a
 balance
 of
 
probabilities.
-­‐ Burden
 may
 rest
 on
 either
 party
 depending
 on
 
the
 circumstance.
-­‐ No
 concept
 of
 punishment.
-­‐ Compensation
 is
 paid
 to
 the
 wronged
 person.
-­‐ Terminology
 used
 is
 different.
-­‐ Claimant
 sues
 the
 defendant
 so
 the
 case
 would
 
be
 referred
 to
 as
 e.g
 Smith
 v
 Megacorp
 plc.
-­‐ State
 plays
 no
 part.

Public
 Law
-­‐ Mainly
 concerned
 with
 government
 and
 the
 functions
 of
 
public
 organizations
 such
 as
 councils
 and
 local
 authorities.
-­‐ State
 prosecutes
 alleged
 perpetrator
 under
 public
 law.
 
-­‐ Criminal
 law
 is
 therefore
 also
 part
 of
 public
 law.
Private
 Law
-­‐ Deals
 with
 relationships
 between
 businesses
 and
 
customers,
 employees
 and
 other
 private
 individuals.
-­‐ The
 state
 does
 not
 get
 involved
 and
 it
 is
 for
 the
 individual
 
concerned
 to
 take
 action.

Statute
 Law
 and
 Common
 Law
Statue
 Law
-­‐ Parliament
 is
 responsible
 for
 statute
 law.
-­‐ Usually
 made
 in
 areas
 so
 complicated
 and
 unique
 that
 
common
 law
 would
 take
 an
 unacceptable
 length
 of
 time
 
to
 develop
 e.g.
 Company
 Law.
Common
 Law
-­‐ Created
 and
 developed
 by
 the
 judiciary.

The
 Court
 System

The
 Importance
 of
 the
 System
 of
 Appeals
(D’00
 Q1a)

-­‐ It
 provides
 an
 opportunity
 for
 those
 who
 are
 dissatisfied
 with
 the
 decision
 of
 one
 court
 to
 have
 the
 matter
 re-­‐considered
 
by
 a
 higher
 court,
 i.e.
 gives
 litigants
 at
 least
 two
 chances
 to
 obtain
 the
 justice
 they
 seek.
-­‐ It
 enables
 a
 higher
 court
 to
 review
 the
 decisions
 of
 lower
 courts
 and
 rectify
 possible
 errors
 as
 to
 facts
 or
 law
 made
 by
 
the
 lower
 court.
-­‐ It
 helps
 to
 develop
 greater
 uniformity
 in
 the
 law
 as
 the
 lower
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