"Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day?" written by William Shakespeare. The other also has the same title, "Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day?" written by Howard Moss.

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The Analyze of Two Poems

- The Final Draft -

The Introduction

In this essay, I would like to analyze two poems that have the same titles. One is "Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day?" written by William Shakespeare. The other also has the same title, "Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day?" written by Howard Moss. In fact, the two poems have not only the same titles but also similar stories. In other words, Moss's poem is a parody of Shakespeare's poem. By the way, how are they different and also similar?

The First Impression of Two Poems

When I first read both Shakespeare's poem and Moss's poem, I could not understand Shakespeare's thought. What I feel about his poem is that it seems to be very unusual while Moss's poem looks very natural. I mean that it is hard to read rather than hard to understand because there are some old English words. For example, Shakespeare states,

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? -1st line

Thou art more lovely and more temperate -2nd line

And summer's lease hath all too short a date -4th line

He used 'thee' and 'thou' instead of 'you' and 'your'. He did not use 'have' but used 'hath'. I feel old English styles of the 16th century through his poem.

A Figure of speech

One of the other reasons that make this poem unusual is that it includes many figures of speech. A figure of speech is an expression or use of language to achieve a particular effect. Figures of speech also include metaphors and similes. There are some metaphors in Shakespeare's poem while Moss's poem is made up of very typical sentences. I think that 'summer's day' in Shakespeare's poem includes lots of meaning. He mentions the day like the paragraph 1. Moss also states,

Who says you're like one of the dog days? -1

You're nicer. And better. -2

And a summer sub-let doesn't last forever. -4

As you know, both the summer's day and the dog days could mean just hot weather in summer. However, the 'summer's day' includes...